Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) Annual Report 2007-08

2007-08 CNSC Activities

Stakeholder Relations

Canadian confidence in CNSC rests on public understanding of its role and responsibilities. CNSC consults regularly with stakeholders and community members, sharing information about its activities and gathering public input in order to develop and maintain trust in its ability to regulate effectively.

2007-08 Stakeholder Relations Activities

CNSC visited, communicated and consulted with communities throughout Canada
  • CNSC is working to reach communities that are directly affected by licensing decisions for nuclear facilities, and seeks their opinions as part of the public hearing process. The Commission Tribunal demonstrated its commitment to community engagement when it visited Oshawa in January 2008, to hold a public hearing regarding the renewal of the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station's power reactor operating licence. While in Oshawa, the Commission also held a public hearing to consider the EA screening report for Zircatec Precision Industries Inc.'s proposed project to produce slightly enriched uranium fuel bundles, among other agenda items.
  • CNSC also conducted outreach and/or information activities in communities with interest in uranium mining activities. CNSC staff participated in numerous community forums (town hall meetings) in northern Saskatchewan, Nunavut, Labrador and Ontario. Overall, CNSC personnel participated in over a dozen such forums and continue to partake in events that focus on educating interested parties on the Canadian nuclear regulatory regime.
  • Each year, CNSC publishes a Staff Report on the Safety Performance of the Canadian Nuclear Power Industry (Industry Report), a comprehensive report card about the performance of Canada's five nuclear power plant sites: Bruce, Darlington, Pickering, Bécancour, and Point Lepreau.
  • In 2007, CNSC held public information sessions about the Industry Report as a means of sharing and discussing it with Canadians. The sessions, held in every Canadian community that hosts nuclear power plants, were well received. They offered an ideal opportunity to engage the public by providing information about nuclear safety while responding to the general concerns of host communities. CNSC plans to hold similar sessions in upcoming years, and anticipates increased attendance as it continues promoting community engagement and as the public becomes more aware of its role and mandate. CNSC will also explore expanding these annual sessions to address a wider spectrum of topics related to nuclear safety and licensing.
  • In September 2007, CNSC received approval from the Commission Tribunal to hold public consultations about two key regulatory documents regarding new nuclear power plants (RD-337, Design of New Nuclear Power Plants, and RD-346, Site Evaluation of New Nuclear Power Plants). CNSC invited stakeholders to give their input on the documents through a two-phase consultation process that was held from October 2007 to January 2008, and from February 2008 to March 2008. The first phase of consultations also included a public information session, held in Toronto in November 2007, to present an overview of the regulatory documents and to explain their safety philosophy, fundamentals and principles. A question period was also included.

After reviewing all comments received via formal online submissions, CNSC posted them on its public Web site in early 2008, to allow stakeholders to review others' comments and respond to them. CNSC modified RD-337 and RD-346 to reflect input where appropriate, is preparing final versions of the two regulatory documents and will present them for final Commission Tribunal approval in early 2008-09.

CNSC engaged licensees
  • CNSC is committed to helping licensees understand and comply with its regulatory regime. Throughout 2007-08, CNSC convened three regional meetings with approximately 130 industrial radiography licensees to clarify regulatory requirements, respond to their concerns and present new regulatory initiatives. CNSC personnel also conducted outreach with licensees in Toronto, Ottawa, and Montreal, continuing a program of cross-country information presentations that were initiated in early 2007. Presentations by CNSC were also made to the Canadian Council of Independent Laboratories Association, the Canadian Radiation Protection Association and the Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists. In addition, CNSC held meetings with the Canadian Organization of Medical Physicists and conducted outreach activities with WesCan, a CNSC licensee, to discuss proposed amendments to the Class II Nuclear Facilities Regulations.
CNSC took steps to strengthen Aboriginal consultation

Canada has statutory, contractual and common-law obligations to consult with Aboriginal groups. Furthermore, The Constitution Act (1982) and subsequent judicial clarifications dictate that Aboriginal groups, including the Indian, Inuit and Métis peoples of Canada, have specific rights. CNSC has established a working group to improve Aboriginal consultations, in addition to its general public consultations.

CNSC continued to improve public communications and the transparency of its process
  • As of January 2008, Commission Tribunal hearings and meetings are broadcasted live on the Internet, allowing people across the country and around the world to view the proceedings. Meetings and hearings are also archived for a three-month period.
  • CNSC is continuously improving the search functionality of and interaction through its public Web site.
  • The following publications were released:
    • HazMat Team Emergency Response Manual for Class 7 Transport Emergencies (INFO-0764)
    • Canadian National Report for the Convention on Nuclear Safety: Fourth Report (INFO-0763)
    • Radioluminous devices - tips for your safety (INFO-0760)
    • Annual CNSC Staff Report for 2006 on the Safety Performance of the Canadian Nuclear Industry (INFO-0761)
    • Annual CNSC Staff Report for 2006 on the National Sealed Source Registry and the Sealed Source Tracking System (INFO-0762)
    • CNSC Employment Equity Annual Report 2006-2007 (INFO-0765)
    • Standards and Guidelines for Tritium in Drinking Water (INFO-0766)
    • Rev. 2 Working Safely with Nuclear Gauges (INFO-9999-4)
    • Annual Report of CNSC and Commission Tribunal (INFO-9999-1 2006-2007)
    • Nuclear Medicine - Use of Unsealed Nuclear Substances (INFO-0728-4)
    • Regulatory Independence: Law, Practice and Perception - A Report to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
CNSC consulted with stakeholders from industry, government and non-governmental organizations
  • CNSC meets periodically with representatives from the Canadian Nuclear Association through the Canadian Nuclear Association Regulatory Affairs Committee, which enables industry representatives to provide input and advice to CNSC on broader issues relating to nuclear regulation in Canada. The committee also provides a forum for the industry association and CNSC to indicate priorities, directions being taken, or factors that are influencing their respective operations.
  • CNSC has a non-governmental organization (NGO) Regulatory Affairs Committee to communicate and consult with NGOs on nuclear regulatory and policy matters within its mandate. Co-chaired by a member of the NGO community, the committee is proving to be a forum for exchanging and clarifying information to promote common understanding of issues, allowing CNSC to better respond to the information needs of the NGO community. It also enables NGO members to provide input and advice to CNSC on broader issues relating to nuclear regulation in Canada.

Highlight: International Activities

Nuclear safety means peace and cooperation

CNSC and its many international partners work together to promote the safe and peaceful use of nuclear materials around the world.

CNSC works in Canada and internationally to advance nuclear safety, security and non-proliferation and to contribute to a peaceful international nuclear sector.

In 2007, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) drew a positive comprehensive safeguards conclusion for Canada, once again granting the country its highest safeguards rating for an IAEA Member State. Using measures collectively referred to as “safeguards,” the IAEA confirmed that declared nuclear material in Canada was not diverted to nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, and that it found no indication of undeclared nuclear material. This finding provided credible assurance that Canada met its international obligations for non-proliferation. CNSC was a key contributor to the IAEA's review, acting as the government authority that implements the agreement by which the IAEA carries out safeguards verification activities in Canada.

2007 was an important year for Canada's participation in the international management of nuclear activities, as CNSC continued implementing the IAEA's Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. Sealed radioactive sources are widely used throughout the world, in fields ranging from major industrial operations and medical diagnosis and treatment to teaching and demonstrations in universities and colleges. The sources are classified according to an internationally accepted risk profile that ranges from very high to very low risk.

Canada has set an international example as the first G8 country to commit to the Code's requirements. CNSC's 2007 launch of an enhanced import and export control program marked Canada's full compliance with the IAEA's Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources and continued commitment to the Code. Together with the National Sealed Source Registry and associated Sealed Source Tracking System, which registers and tracks high-risk radioactive sources and devices, strengthened controls are in place to assure Canadians and the global community of secure international transfers of these sources.

During the year, CNSC broadened its network of bilateral Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) on regulatory cooperation. MOUs were signed with Australia, the Republic of Korea and South Africa, strengthening the sharing of best practices and international goodwill.

CNSC also contributed to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency, a forum to develop consensus on technical matters and to foster best regulatory practices in areas such as nuclear installation safety, radiation protection, inspection, and evaluation of new reactor designs.

During 2007-08, CNSC maintained an influential role in IAEA activities. CNSC made important contributions to developing international standards through represen-tation to the IAEA Commission on Safety Standards and subcommittees on standards for nuclear facilities, radiation protection, transport and waste. CNSC also worked in concert with the IAEA to host the annual CANDU Senior Regulators' Meeting, which took place in Canada in 2007. CNSC welcomed senior regulatory representatives from all countries that operate CANDU reactors to the forum. This allowed the sharing of information and experience regarding this Canadian-designed technology.

As part of its mandate, CNSC provides extensive First Responder training to law enforcement and emergency service organizations. Throughout 2007, this work assumed a growing international dimension. CNSC's collaboration with other federal departments has led to the delivery of 30 training programs in Southeast Asia and is improving the capacity of recipient countries to respond to acts of terrorism.

CNSC continues to look for opportunities to support the safe and peaceful use of nuclear materials and equipment in Canada and around the world.

2007-08 CNSC Activities

Management and Enabling Infrastructure

CNSC is continuously improving management practices, internal systems and processes to ensure effective delivery of its regulatory program.

2007-08 Management and Enabling Infrastructure Activities

CNSC further developed and formalized a quality management system
  • In September 2005, CNSC committed to implementing a formal quality management system, which would conform to Government of Canada requirements and be modeled on the IAEA's management system standards for nuclear regulatory bodies. When fully implemented, CNSC's management system will integrate and standardize CNSC principles and processes.
  • During 2007, CNSC developed and released its Management System Manual, which identifies high-level principles and processes by which CNSC achieves its goals and objectives. The manual provides a framework for more detailed processes and procedures, and is a key document for all CNSC employees to ensure consistent, high-quality results across the organization.
  • CNSC created high-level process maps for its licensing and compliance activities. These documents will serve as a blueprint for licensing and compliance procedures, leading to consistent, well-founded regulatory decisions and licensing recommendations.
  • CNSC streamlined licensing processes and advanced an improved EA process.
  • Detailed technical assessment processes and review guides were initiated to support applications for new power reactors and reviews related to EA work performed by CNSC personnel.
  • Scoping and planning activities were completed to support integrated planning and performance management processes.
  • An integrated electronic document and records management system was introduced in 2007-08. CNSC is now receiving some regulatory information electronically and testing an online licensee filing tool. Next steps include the full implementation of an e-filing tool, along with development of associated procedures, templates, and communications materials.
  • CNSC is developing information systems and processes to increase compliance with federal security standards for communications networks, electronic document handling technologies and appropriate administrative procedures.
CNSC invested in employee development
  • CNSC created an orientation program for both employees and managers. The program will be implemented during the upcoming year.
  • The organization invested in leadership coaching for managers and executives. A new management training program will be developed by the end of 2008-09.
  • CNSC held two leadership forums where managers discussed leadership issues, four sessions involving formal presentation and panels, and other leadership training throughout the year.
  • Individual training through formal courses was offered to employees across the organization.
  • CNSC began developing an online resource centre to provide tools for leadership and management.
CNSC built strong, cooperative relationships with employees
  • After signing a first collective agreement in 2006, CNSC consulted regularly with the employee union to discuss labour relations. The agreement, which took effect in late 2006, covered the period from June 14, 2004 to March 31, 2008.
  • CNSC has worked to maintain a productive working relationship with the bargaining, agent and with employees that are not represented. In the coming year, CNSC will undertake collective bargaining, since the current collective agreement will have expired.
CNSC sustained proactive recruitment efforts
  • CNSC is growing and requires sufficient resources to continue delivering its mandate. During 2007-08, the organization recruited new employees in a highly competitive labour market, outpacing average recruitment levels in the broader public service.
CNSC improved emergency preparedness
  • CNSC adopted a formal business continuity planning program that will enable the organization to protect its resources and deliver critical services during emergencies. As part of this, work is underway to develop a pandemic influenza plan.
CNSC met requirements of the Federal Accountability Act

The Federal Accountability Act was passed into law by Parliament on December 12, 2006. CNSC is implementing policies, controls and procedures to meet provisions of this law, which aims to improve government transparency and accountability of operations.

  • CNSC developed a prototype Contract Review Committee to ensure that contractual activities are conducted fairly and openly.
  • CNSC created an internal control and policy management organization.
  • Initiatives have been taken to bring CNSC's contracting and procurement functions in line with modern comptrollership principles.

Commission Tribunal Hearings and Meetings

CNSC's Commission Tribunal makes decisions on the licensing of major nuclear facilities through a public hearing process. A public hearing gives affected parties and members of the public an opportunity to be heard before the Commission Tribunal, which deliberates after the hearing and renders its decision on the matter at hand. Full Commission Tribunal documentation is available on CNSC's Web site at nuclearsafety.gc.ca

CNSC improved the effectiveness and efficiency of the Commission Tribunal licensing process

  • During 2007-08, the Commission Tribunal held a greater number of abridged hearings, which allow certain types of licence amendments to be addressed more efficiently. Abridged hearings, which are held to deal with decisions that are administrative in nature or when licence amendments requested are less significant, provide greater efficiency and speed of process while ensuring safety as the key consideration.

2007-08 Commission Tribunal Hearings

Class IA nuclear facilities

Bruce Power Inc.
  • Decision to amend the power reactor operating licences for the Bruce A and Bruce B Nuclear Generating Stations to reflect the removal of organizational documents and the addition of three new licence conditions
    Abridged hearing (January 15, 2008)
  • Decision to amend the power reactor operating licences for the Bruce A and Bruce B Nuclear Generating Stations
    Abridged hearing (March 11, 2008)
  • Decision to amend the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station power reactor operating licences to reference the latest revision of the operating policies and principles
    Abridged hearing (March 20, 2008)
  • Decision to amend the power reactor operating licences for the Bruce A and Bruce B Nuclear Generating Stations
    Abridged hearing (March 28, 2008)
Hydro-Québec
  • Decision to amend the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station's operating licence with respect to the deadline for conducting testing of the leak rate from the reactor building
    Abridged hearing (June 25, 2007)
McMaster University
  • Decision to renew the operating licence for McMaster University's Class IA non-power reactor
    Public hearing (May 16, 2007)
New Brunswick Power Nuclear
  • Decision to approve proposed revisions to a Point Lepreau Generating Station reference document and to amend the Point Lepreau Generating Station's power reactor operating licence
    Abridged hearing (June 25, 2007)
  • Decision to amend the Point Lepreau Generating Station's power reactor operating licence to reflect updates in documentation
    Abridged hearing (October 16, 2007)
  • Decision to amend the Point Lepreau Generating Station's power reactor operating licence to authorize the conduct of written requalification testing of certified staff
    Abridged hearing (December 28, 2007)
Ontario Power Generation Inc.
  • Decision to amend the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station's power reactor operating licence to reflect updates in documentation
    Abridged hearing (June 25, 2007)
  • Decision to amend the Pickering A Nuclear Generating Station's power reactor operating licence to reflect updates in documentation
    Abridged hearing (June 25, 2007)
  • Decision to amend the Pickering B Nuclear Generating Station's power reactor operating licence to reflect updates in documentation
    Abridged hearing (June 25, 2007)
  • Decision to amend the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station's power reactor operating licence regarding recertification of personnel
    Abridged hearing (October 26, 2007)
  • Decision to accept the financial guarantee and licence amendment for Ontario Power Generation Inc.'s Class I nuclear facility licences in Ontario
    Public hearing (November 1, 2007)
  • Decision to renew the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station's power reactor operating licence
    Public hearing (November 1, 2007, January 10, 2008 and February 20, 2008)
  • Decision to amend the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station's power reactor operating licence
    Abridged hearing (February 12 and 13, 2008)
  • Decision to amend the Pickering B Nuclear Generating Station's power reactor operating licence
    Abridged hearing (February 12, 2008)
  • Decision to amend the Pickering A Nuclear Generating Station's power reactor operating licence
    Abridged hearing (February 13, 2008)
Saskatchewan Research Council
  • Decision to amend the SLOWPOKE-2 facility's Class IA non-power reactor operating licence to maintain a financial guarantee
    Abridged hearing (August 7, 2007)

Class IB nuclear facilities

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  • Decision to approve the operation of shielded modular above-ground storage buildings at the Chalk River Laboratories
    Abridged hearing (January 10, 2008)
  • Decision to amend the non-power reactor operating licence for the Dedicated Isotope Facilities
    Abridged hearing (March 5, 2008)
  • Decision to renew the operating licence for the Dedicated Isotope Facilities at the Chalk River Laboratories
    Public hearing (June 22, 2007 and September 12, 2007)
Cameco Corporation
  • Decision to amend the Blind River Refinery's Class IB nuclear fuel facility operating licence
    Abridged hearing (April 12, 2007)
  • Decision to accept the financial guarantee for the future decommissioning of the Class IB nuclear fuel facility in Blind River, Ontario
    Abridged hearing (September 13, 2007)
  • Decision to accept the financial guarantee for the future decommissioning of the Class IB nuclear conversion facility in Port Hope, Ontario
    Abridged hearing (September 13, 2007)
General Electric Canada Company Inc.
  • Decision to issue new licences for the Toronto and Peterborough Class IB nuclear fuel operating facilities
    Abridged hearing (May 15, 2007)
Shield Source Inc.
  • Decision to accept the financial guarantee for the future decommissioning of the Class IB nuclear substance processing facility in Peterborough, Ontario
    Abridged hearing (April 12, 2007)
SRB Technologies (Canada) Inc.
  • Decision to amend SRB Technologies (Canada) Inc.'s nuclear substance processing facility possession licence for its Class IB nuclear substance processing facility in Pembroke, Ontario
    Public hearing (April 12, 2007)
  • Decision to approve a financial guarantee for the safe state of closure for SRB Technologies (Canada) Inc.'s Class IB nuclear substance processing facility in Pembroke, Ontario
    Abridged hearing (September 12, 2007)
Rio Algom Limited
  • Decision to approve the application to amend the Class IB waste facility operating licence for the replacement of the Stanleigh effluent treatment plant
    Public hearing (May 16, 2007)
trIUMF Accelerators Inc.
  • Decision to accept the financial guarantee for the future decommissioning of the trIUMF particle accelerator facility located in Vancouver, British Columbia
    Public hearing (December 5, 2007)
Zircatec Precision Industries Inc.
  • Decision to approve guidelines for an EA of Zircatec Precision Industries Inc.'s proposal to produce slightly enriched uranium fuel bundles at its Class IB nuclear fuel facility in Port Hope, Ontario
    Public hearing (June 22, 2007)
  • Decision to approve the financial guarantee for the future decommissioning of Zircatec Precision Industries Inc.'s Class IB nuclear fuel facility in Port Hope, Ontario
    Abridged hearing (September 13, 2007)
  • Decision on the EA screening for Zircatec Precision Industries Inc.'s proposed production of slightly enriched uranium CANDU fuel bundles at its Class IB nuclear fuel facility in Port Hope, Ontario
    Public hearing (January 9, 2008)

Uranium mines and mills

AREVA Resources Canada Inc.
  • Decision on the EA track report regarding AREVA Resources Canada Inc.'s proposed project that includes mining uranium ore deposit at its Midwest location in northern Saskatchewan Public hearing (April 12, 2007)
  • Approval of guidelines (scope of project and assessment) for an EA of a proposed open-pit mine for the Caribou uranium deposit at the McClean Lake Operation site in northern Saskatchewan
    Abridged hearing (October 31, 2007)
Cameco Corporation
  • Decision to amend the Cigar Lake Project uranium mine construction licence
    Public hearing (November 1, 2007)
  • Decision to amend the value of the financial guarantee for the Cigar Lake Project
    Abridged hearing (March 28, 2008)

Waste management facilities

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  • Decision to approve the construction of shielded modular above-ground storage buildings at the Chalk River Laboratories
    Abridged hearing (May 1, 2007)
  • Approval of EA guidelines (scope of project and assessment) for the proposed construction and operation of a bulk materials landfill at the Chalk River Laboratories
    Abridged hearing (October 31, 2007)
Ontario Power Generation Inc.
  • Decision to renew the Western Waste Management Facility's operating licence
    Public hearing (January 24, 2007 and April 11, 2007)
  • Decision to issue an operating licence for the Darlington Waste Management Facility
    Public hearing (June 22, 2007 and September 12, 2007)
  • Decision to renew the Pickering Waste Management Facility's operating licence
    Public hearing (December 5, 2007 and February 20, 2008)

2007-08 Commission Tribunal Meetings

The Commission Tribunal holds public meetings to make legislative, policy or administrative decisions and to be briefed on topics related to the nuclear regulatory process. At these meetings, members are also sometimes asked to make decisions on certain matters.

At Commission Tribunal meetings, CNSC personnel may also present performance reports and updates about important nuclear projects. These presentations are followed by Commission member discussions on significant development reports, facility or sector developments, or status reports.

During 2007-08, the Commission Tribunal held 7 meetings. A list of all items discussed during is available at nuclearsafety.gc.ca

Performance Standards

Activity

Performance standard

Target

Performance 2005-06

Performance 2006-07

Performance 2007-08

1

Verification: Upon completion of the verification activity, CNSC will:

Issue Type I Inspection Report2

Within 60
business days

80%

50%

58%

69%

Issue Type II Inspection Report3

Within 40
business days

80%

86%

90%

85%

Issue Desktop Review Report

Within 60
business days

90%

70%

79%

95%

Enforcement: upon an Order being made, CNSC will:

Confirm, amend, revoke or replace the Order (see regulatory guide G-273, Making, Reviewing and Receiving Orders Under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act)

Within 10
business days

100%

100%

100%

100%

Licensing 1: For requests pertaining to an existing licence, CNSC will:

Screen the request for completeness and issue notification that the licensing request is/is not complete Activity 4, Activity 5

Within 20
business days

90%

100%

97%

56%

Issue a licensing decision when a public hearing is not required, assuming an EA under the CEAA is not required

Within 80
business days

80%

97%

98%

83%

Issue a licensing decision when a public hearing is required, assuming an EA under the CEAA is not required (see INFO-0715, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Public Hearings on Licensing Matters)Activity 5

Within 160
business days

90%

100%

83%

100%

Access to Information

Respond to requests under the Access to Information Act and Privacy ActActivity 6

Within legislated time periods as stated in the acts

100%

94%

Access to information: 82%
Privacy: 100%

Access to information: 61%

Privacy: 100%

External Communications

Place public hearings advertisements

Within deadlines stipulated in the regulations

100%

95%

100%

100%

Response time to public inquiries

Same-day acknowledgement, with response time for completion of request depending upon complexity:

100%

100%

100%

100%

 

Low - same day

100%

100%

100%

100%

 

Medium - within 5 business days

100%

95%

95%

95%

 

High - within
10 business days

100%

80%

75%

80%

1 Compliance and licensing results are based upon available performance data.

2 Using CNSC's risk-informed approach to regulation, initial priority was given to the completion of reports whose results were of greater significance.

3 In power reactors, unless major issues arise, findings from field inspections and control room inspections will be reported on a quarterly basis, within 40 business days of end of quarter.

4 Initial priority was given to screening of requests from licensees that are of higher risk.

5 The screening and hearing processes do not apply to licensing and certification activities that are related to nuclear substances, radiation devices, Class II facilities, prescribed equipment, transport and packaging.

6 CNSC received 120 requests for access to information during 2007-08, an approximately 67% increase from the 72 requests in 2006-07. Of the 2007-08 requests, more than half were received in the fourth quarter of the fiscal year and many were of significant length and complexity. CNSC has added two full-time employees to its Access to Information and Privacy Program and implemented additional measures to ensure full future compliance with legislated timelines in the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act.

Commission Tribunal Decisions

Number of decisions in 2007-08

43

Average number of days to release decision

16

Decisions released within 30 days

41

Decisions released after 30 days

2

 

Highlight: Licensing and Compliance

Nuclear safety means oversight of licensees

CNSC ensures that nuclear materials, facilities and activities are safe for Canadians and the environment. It does this by continuously enhancing regulatory oversight by amending regulations, imposing licence conditions, and verifying licensee compliance with legal requirements and CNSC expectations.

Over the past year, CNSC invested significant effort in simplifying and improving its licensing and compliance processes while collaborating with other federal departments and agencies.

Throughout 2007-08, CNSC advanced several organization-wide initiatives to increase the efficiency of internal processes, including those that affect licensing and compliance. For example, an initiative was launched to increase the amount of online information about CNSC's licensing and compliance processes. The 2008-09 fiscal year will see the introduction of a new CNSC Web site that, over time, will provide a range of general and licensee-specific information and business tools.

Every application to prepare a site for and/or construct a Class I nuclear facility or a uranium mine or mill triggers an Environmental Assessment (EA) under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. EAs are an important facet of the licensing process, and many are likely to be conducted in the coming years as part of applications to construct new nuclear power plants and uranium mines. During the year, joint review panel agreements were drafted with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency for Bruce Power Inc.'s proposed project to build new reactors in Ontario, and Ontario Power Generation Inc.'s Deep Geologic Repository. In support of these two projects, discussions were held with the Saugeen Ojibway First Nations, and led to the development of a consultation plan with them.

In Fall 2007, the Government of Canada created the Major Projects Management Office (MPMO) to serve as a single entry point into the federal regulatory process for licensees and stakeholders by coordinating all federal regulators involved in major resources projects. CNSC is participating in the MPMO initiative for major nuclear projects. The MPMO will track and monitor these projects as they proceed through the regulatory process.

Among other improvements to its compliance verification processes in 2007, CNSC implemented performance measures for its National Sealed Source Registry and associated Sealed Source Tracking System, which track high-risk radioactive sealed sources from their manufacture to final disposition. By the end of December 2007, the registry had information on 13,556 radioactive sealed sources in Canada, an increase of 6,406 sources over the previous year.

CNSC has also been working with other government departments to ensure the safety and security of radioactive materials. For example, in December 2007, CNSC and Transport Canada updated a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) first signed in 1981. Nuclear substances are classified as Class 7 dangerous goods under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations. The new MOU clarifies responsibilities for the transport of radioactive materials in Canada and promotes enhanced collaboration and communication between the two parties.

All these efforts demonstrate CNSC's commitment to timeliness, transparency, and a safe and secure nuclear sector.