Report on Plans and Priorities 2015-16

The Honourable Greg Rickford, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Natural Resources

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
2015–16 Report on Plans and Priorities
ISSN: 2292-3322
Catalogue number:  CC171-18/2015E

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of Natural Resources, 2015.

Table of Contents

President's Message

As President of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), it is my pleasure to present the 2015–16 CNSC Report on Plans and Priorities.

This picture portrays the President of the CNSC Michael Binder

Over the past year, we have undertaken an extensive review of our strategic planning framework to reflect the important changes taking place in the nuclear sector. As the sole regulator responsible for all nuclear activities in Canada, it is important that our work both reflect and anticipate the needs of a changing industry, and that we continue to ensure the safety of Canadians and the environment. As a result, we have developed a new strategic plan identifying key organizational goals and priorities. We have also amended our Program Alignment Architecture to more clearly reflect the fundamental aspects of our regulatory work.

We will focus on five strategic priorities this year. The first is to continue to provide regulatory oversight of licensed nuclear facilities. We will consider new licence applications and public hearings for the re-licensing of the Bruce nuclear generating station (NGS) and the refurbishment of the Darlington NGS. We will also continue to ensure safe waste management as well as deal with any work related to the Deep Geologic Repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. In addition, we will continue to deliver commitments on lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident that occurred in Japan in March 2011.

The second priority supports modern nuclear regulation to ensure we use science-based, risk-informed and technically sound regulatory practices that consider scientific uncertainties and evolving expectations. Activities will include reviewing how changes in societal expectations could affect such matters as defence in depth associated with facilities or ensuring that environmental factors are an integral part of regulatory decisions made under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act.

The third priority focuses on efforts to be a trusted regulator and to be recognized by the public and industry as independent, open and transparent, as well as a credible source of scientific, technical and regulatory information. Under this priority, one of our activities will be to review the Commission's public hearing processes and examine the best practices of other quasi-judicial tribunals, and identify potential options for improvement.

The fourth priority looks to increase our global nuclear influence by ensuring we leverage our expertise as a world-class regulator to influence global nuclear efforts to enhance international nuclear safety, security and nuclear non-proliferation. We will develop clear objectives and a targeted agenda for long-term strategic benefits to both the CNSC and Canada. Our work will be aimed at enhancing global nuclear safety.

Our final priority is to continue to improve management effectiveness. The CNSC has been working – and will continue to work – to strengthen workforce planning, leverage technology to support a mobile computing strategy and further integrate operational and corporate planning. Lastly, we must continue to explore opportunities for efficiency in all our activities.

On behalf of the CNSC, I wish to thank our staff, our licensees, our stakeholders and the public for their continued confidence and support in our efforts to regulate Canada's nuclear industry and to keep Canada and Canadians safe. Rest assured that we will continue to be true to our goals and will never compromise safety.

Michael Binder
President

Top of page

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: Greg Rickford
Deputy head: Michael Binder
Ministerial portfolio: Natural Resources Canada Endnote i
Year established: 2000
Main legislative authorities: Nuclear Safety and Control Act Endnote ii

Organizational context

Raison d'être

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) was established on May 31, 2000, with the coming into effect of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA). It replaced the Atomic Energy Control Board established in 1946 by the Atomic Energy Control Act. The CNSC is a departmental corporation listed in Schedule II of the Financial Administration ActEndnote iii, and reports to Parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources.

Mission

To regulate nuclear activities in order to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment, and to implement Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy.

Mandate

Under the NSCA, the CNSC:

  • regulates the development, production and use of nuclear energy in Canada to protect health, safety and the environment
  • regulates the production, possession, use and transport of nuclear substances, and the production, possession and use of prescribed equipment and prescribed information
  • implements measures respecting international control of the development, production, transport and use of nuclear energy and substances, including measures respecting the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and nuclear explosive devices
  • is responsible for disseminating objective scientific, technical and regulatory information concerning the CNSC's activities, and about how the development, production, possession, transport and use of nuclear substances affect the environment and the health and safety of persons

Responsibilities

The CNSC is an independent regulatory agency and quasi-judicial administrative tribunal, and provides regulatory oversight of all nuclear-related activities and substances in Canada.

Environmental protection is a key element of the CNSC's mission and mandate. As the sole responsible authority for nuclear projects under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012Endnote iv (CEAA 2012), the CNSC carries out environmental assessments in accordance with this legislation. For nuclear projects that no longer require environmental assessments under CEAA 2012, the NSCA continues to ensure the public and environment are protected through environmental assessments under the NSCA. The CNSC is also responsible for designating installations under the Nuclear Liability Act.Endnote v

The CNSC is Canada's authority with respect to the implementation of nuclear safeguards, as set out in the agreement between the Government of Canada and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear WeaponsEndnote vi. It administers the nuclear non-proliferation provisions of bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements between the Government of Canada and foreign nuclear trading partners, in conjunction with regulatory controls on the export and import of nuclear substances, equipment and information.

The Commission has up to seven permanent members, appointed by the Governor in Council, and is supported by CNSC employees across Canada. The CNSC President is a full-time Commission member, while other members may be appointed to serve on a full- or part-time basis. Temporary members can also be appointed by the Governor in Council, as required. Commission members are chosen according to their credentials, and are independent of any political party, government, industry or special interest group.   

The Commission is an independent quasi-judicial administrative tribunal set up at arm's length from government. The Commission makes most decisions in a public forum, guided by clear rules of procedure. Interested parties and members of the public can request to be heard and intervene at most public proceedings of the Commission. The proceedings are webcast live and periodically held in communities close to major nuclear facilities, to make them as accessible as possible to local residents.

The Commission provides extensive reasons for its decisions, which are founded on science-based technical information that may include public input as well as the recommendations of expert CNSC staff. Decisions, hearing transcripts, webcast archives, CNSC Online resource modules, and other documentation are publicly available on the CNSC website, Facebook and YouTube.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

The following illustrates the CNSC's strategic outcome, as well as the complete framework of programs and sub-programs, which support the strategic outcome.

  • 1. Strategic Outcome: Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and an informed public on the effectiveness of Canada's nuclear regulatory regime. 
    • 1.1 Program: Nuclear Fuel Cycle
      • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: Uranium Mines and Mills
      • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: Nuclear Processing Facilities
      • 1.1.3 Sub-Program: Nuclear Waste Management Facilities
    • 1.2 Program: Nuclear Reactors
      • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: Nuclear Power Plants
      • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: Research Reactors
    • 1.3 Program: Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment
      • 1.3.1 Sub-Program: Medical Sector
      • 1.3.2 Sub-Program: Industrial Sector
      • 1.3.3 Sub-Program: Commercial Sector
      • 1.3.4 Sub-Program: Academic and Research Sector
      • 1.3.5 Sub-Program: Packaging and Transport
      • 1.3.6 Sub-Program: Dosimetry Services
    • 1.4 Program: Nuclear Non-Proliferation
      • 1.4.1 Sub-Program: Domestic and International Arrangements
      • 1.4.2 Sub-Program: Safeguards
      • 1.4.3 Sub-Program: Import and Export
    • 1.5 Program: Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information
      • 1.5.1 Sub-Program: Regulatory Framework
      • 1.5.2 Sub-Program: Scientific and Technical Information
      • 1.5.3 Sub-Program: Research
      • 1.5.4 Sub-Program: Public Engagement and Outreach
    • Internal Services

Organizational priorities

The CNSC undertakes regulatory oversight of the nuclear industry and activities in Canada.

Following a year-long strategic review of the organization, the CNSC has adopted a new Strategic Planning Framework and a new Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) to be implemented in 2015–16. The new architecture more clearly reflects the fundamental aspects of our regulatory work.

The new PAA includes the following:

  • Nuclear Fuel Cycle Program
  • Nuclear Reactors Program
  • Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment Program
  • Nuclear Non-Proliferation Program
  • Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information Program
  • Internal Services

In addition to the program architecture and as part of the strategic plan, the CNSC will focus this year on five overarching strategic priorities to ensure the success of the above programs. The priorities for this planning period are:

  1. Provide regulatory oversight of the nuclear industry
  2. Modern nuclear regulation
  3. Trusted regulator
  4. Global nuclear influence
  5. Improving management effectiveness.
Organizational Priorities
Priority Type Footnote 1 Programs

Provide regulatory oversight for licensing and certification  of nuclear facilities and activities and also ensure compliance with the regulatory regime

  • Ongoing

Nuclear Fuel Cycle; Nuclear Reactors; Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment; Nuclear Non-Proliferation

Description

Why is this a priority?

The CNSC regulates all nuclear facilities and activities in Canada. It is imperative that all facilities and activities operate safely and make adequate provision to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment, and that Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy are respected.

The licensing / certification and compliance of nearly 2,000 licensees is a major part of the CNSC's core work.

The objective of this priority is to ensure licensed operations remain safe and secure.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • licensing and oversight of existing major nuclear facilities and activities
    • re-licensing of the Darlington (including its refurbishment) and Bruce nuclear generating stations
  • licensing oversight of safe waste management
  • continuing to deliver commitments on the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident
Priority Type Footnote 2 Programs

Modern nuclear regulation: Ensure the CNSC uses science-based, risk-informed and technically sound regulatory practices that take into account scientific uncertainties and evolving expectations

  • New

Nuclear Fuel Cycle; Nuclear Reactors; Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment; Nuclear Non-Proliferation; Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information

Description

Why is this a priority?

The CNSC is a science-based organization and makes its decisions on scientific evidence. Like all organizations, the CNSC operates in a rapidly changing environment. It has an obligation to continuously review the changes to determine if they have any meaningful implications for the way the CNSC regulates nuclear activities.

Important changes in technology or in basic nuclear science can have an impact on the CNSC's regulatory approach. Fundamental changes are also taking place in how stakeholders and the public perceive their role in the regulatory approvals process. The CNSC needs to ensure that it fully understands these societal changes and how they impact its responsibilities as a modern regulator. The CNSC needs to ensure it has the tools and processes required to meet the challenges brought on by change.

The CNSC has for many years used a “risk-informed” approach to licensing the many varied nuclear activities of the industry. The CNSC needs to ensure that there is a common understanding and consistent application of “risk-informed” approaches in all of its branches in support for both licensing and compliance activities.

The objective of this priority is to ensure the CNSC maintains a regulatory regime that reflects new technological and scientific developments.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • strengthen regulatory oversight by considering and adapting to changes in industry, society, science and technology
  • articulate and implement improved tools and processes for the continued enhanced use of science in regulatory decision-making
  • develop a common understanding and consistent approach to “risk-informed” for both licensing and compliance
Priority Type Footnote 3 Programs

Trusted regulator: Ensure the CNSC is recognized by the public and industry as an independent, open and transparent regulator, and credible source of scientific, technical and regulatory information

  • New

Nuclear Fuel Cycle; Nuclear Reactors; Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment; Nuclear Non-Proliferation; Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information

Description

Why is this a priority?

The CNSC is mandated through legislation to disseminate objective, scientific and technical information. In doing this, the CNSC must engage in meaningful, science-based dialogue, to create a climate of trust and openness between stakeholders and the nuclear regulator, and work to ensure the transparency of the public hearing process to reach out to new audiences beyond those traditionally interested in nuclear safety and science.

It is critical that the CNSC consults and provides the appropriate information to Aboriginal groups, the public and communities near existing or potential future nuclear facilities to enhance their understanding of how the CNSC regulates the nuclear industry.

The CNSC has an important role to play in providing objective, scientific and technical information. It is important that the CNSC gauge how it is perceived by the public and evaluates the effectiveness of its efforts in disseminating scientific information and makes adjustments accordingly.

The objective of this priority is to ensure the CNSC is seen as independent, open and transparent, and through strengthened consultation, communication and outreach efforts, can facilitate Canadians' understanding of nuclear safety and science.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • strengthen the approach to public participation, which reflects direct community interests in order to solicit value-added input that informs CNSC decision-making
  • take steps to ensure communities have access to information about regulated facilities and activities
  • establish a mechanism for ongoing assessment of stakeholder perceptions of the CNSC
  • make the CNSC an authoritative source for scientific information on nuclear safety
Priority Type Footnote 4 Programs

Global nuclear influence: To ensure the CNSC leverages and influences global nuclear efforts, relevant to Canadian interests and activities, to enhance international nuclear safety, security and non-proliferation

  • New

Nuclear Fuel Cycle; Nuclear Reactors; Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment; Nuclear Non-Proliferation

Description

Why is this a priority?

The safety associated with the nuclear industry is global and in this context the CNSC must ensure that it partners with international regulators, governments, industry and the public to advance regulatory issues related to nuclear safety and security of particular interest to Canada.

The objective of this priority is to leverage the CNSC's expertise as a world-class regulator to influence global nuclear regulatory efforts in support of Canadian interests.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • develop clear objectives and a targeted agenda for the long term strategic benefits to Canada and the CNSC related to nuclear regulatory issues of safety and security
  • develop an improved framework for enhanced global nuclear safety through Canada and the CNSC's support of international peer reviews
Priority Type Footnote 5 Programs

Improving management effectiveness: To ensure that the CNSC is a dynamic, flexible and highly-skilled organization, supported by modern management practices and tools and responds to an evolving workforce and industry

  • New

Nuclear Fuel Cycle; Nuclear Reactors; Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment; Nuclear Non-Proliferation; Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information; Internal Services Program

Description

Why is this a priority?

Parliament and Canadians expect the federal government to be well-managed and to exercise sound and efficient stewardship of public funds and resources. In this context, the Government of Canada is challenging departments and agencies to find efficiencies in programs, processes and tools to further the overall effectiveness of government operations. In addition, given changes in the nuclear industry – both in the closing of major nuclear facilities as well as delays in starting new major projects – the CNSC must adjust to, and manage, any impacts to its cost-recovery regime.

The CNSC must maintain a high level of effectiveness while balancing the realities of a changing work environment. It must create a flexible, effective workplace, without compromise to safety, and maintain a high level of employee engagement. The CNSC's plans will focus on adopting modern technology, tools and practices to ensure it remains nimble and remains able to adapt to Canadian nuclear industry regulatory oversight challenges and opportunities.

The objective of this priority is to increase the CNSC's ability to effectively respond to industry regulatory requirements, and continue to improve management of its human, capital and technological resources and activities.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • implement more rigorous strategic workforce planning supported by analysis of the CNSC's needs
  • leverage technology through the development of a mobile computing strategy and increase the use of the CNSC's e-portal
  • provide leadership on relevant Government of Canada regulatory reform commitments
  • undertake a review of CNSC financial systems to support the Government of Canada strategy for the Financial Management Transformation Initiative.
  • consolidate strategic planning to incorporate enterprise risk profiles, e-scans, etc. and further integrate corporate and operational planning

Risk analysis

Key risks
Risk Risk response strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Changing regulatory environment

Strategic planning

Internal services

The CNSC operates in a dynamic environment that is greatly influenced by changing industry patterns and global economies. The CNSC continues to make adjustments to its plans to adequately respond to the evolution of the industry. These events include:

  • the shutdown of the Gentilly-2 nuclear power plant in Bécancour, Québec on December 28, 2012
  • delays in proceedings with new uranium mine projects
  • the Ontario government's announcement on October 10, 2013 that it will defer investing, for the foreseeable future, in new nuclear generating reactors at the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station; the licensing process for Ontario Power Generation's proposed Deep Geologic Repository for low- to intermediate-level radioactive waste depends on the environmental assessment currently underway via a joint review panel and on the Minister of the Environment's decision

In response to changing industry activities, the CNSC engaged in extensive strategic planning and enterprise risk framework development in 2014–15, to ensure it could continue to operate effectively while providing regulatory oversight of Canada's nuclear industry. The CNSC is committed to ensuring the safety and security of all Canadian nuclear facilities and activities, overseeing nuclear processes used solely for peaceful purposes, and building public confidence in the nuclear regulatory regime's effectiveness.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending—dollars)
2015-16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
133,179,745 141,533,432 143,098,835 143,375,297
Human Resources (Full-time equivalents—FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
791 791 781
Budgetary planning summary for strategic outcome(s) and program(s) (dollars)
Strategic outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2012-13 Expenditures 2013-14 Expenditures 2014-15 Forecast spending 2015-16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
Strategic outcome 1: Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and an informed public on the effectiveness of Canada's nuclear regulatory regime   

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Program

      11,523,104 12,245,890 12,381,333 12,405,253

Nuclear Reactors Program

      38,370,191 40,776,958 41,227,964 41,307,614

Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment Program

      11,891,601 12,637,501 12,777,275 12,801,961

Nuclear Non-Proliferation Program

      6,299,582 6,694,722 6,768,768 6,781,845

Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information Program

      26,283,818 27,932,468 28,241,410 28,295,972
Strategic Outcome subtotal       94,368,296 100,287,539 101,396,750 101,592,645
Internal Services subtotal       38,811,449 41,245,893 41,702,085 41,782,652
Total       133,179,745 141,533,432 143,098,835 143,375,297

Regulatory Framework Program

29,683,036 27,536,138 28,788,084        

Licensing and Certification Program

25,303,827 24,072,978 19,359,475        

Compliance Program

41,778,894 48,652,198 49,012,340        
Strategic Outcome subtotal 96,765,757 100,261,314 97,159,899        
Internal Services subtotal 42,933,397 45,355,707 41,316,481        
Total 139,699,154 145,617,021 138,476,380        

The decrease from 2013–14 to 2014–15 is attributable to the one-time federal government employee benefit adjustment allowing for accumulated severance to be paid out in 2013–14, and to a reduction in regulatory oversight activities due to Hydro-Québec's shutdown of the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station in December 2012.

The CNSC overall spending plans indicate no significant changes in resource requirements over the 2014–15 to 2017–18 period. The marginal increase in planned spending is mainly caused by cost-of-living adjustments, including salary and wages.

The difference between 2015–16 Main Estimates ($133,179,745) and planned spending for 2015–16 ($141,533,432) and future years ($143,098,835 for 2016-17 and $143,375,297 for 2017-18) is mainly because of statutory benefit contributions related to personnel expenditures recovered from applicants and licensees through fees (currently not included in the Main Estimates).

The planned spending levels out between 2016–17 and 2017–18 because of expected reductions in nuclear industry regulatory requirements, partly offset by increases to cost of living.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2015-16 Planned Spending With the Whole-of-Government-FrameworkEndnote vii (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2015-16 Planned Spending

1. Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and an informed public on the effectiveness of Canada's nuclear regulatory regime  

1.1 Nuclear Fuel Cycle

Social affairs

A safe and secure Canada

12,245,890

1.2 Nuclear Reactors

Social affairs

A safe and secure Canada

40,776,958

1.3 Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment

Social affairs

A safe and secure Canada

12,637,501

1.4 Nuclear Non-Proliferation

Social affairs

A safe and secure Canada

6,694,722

1.5. Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information

Social affairs

A safe and secure Canada

27,932,468
Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending

Economic Affairs

0

Social Affairs

100,287,539

International Affairs

0

Government Affairs

0
Departmental spending trend
This is a bar graph showing planned spending for six fiscal years (FY 2012—13 to FY 2017–18). The overall spending plans are all approximately $140 million and indicate no significant changes in resource requirements.
Description
Departmental Spending Graph
Fiscal year Voted Statutory Sunset Programs – Anticipated
2012–13 37,676,689 102,022,465 0
2013–14 46,130,800 99,486,221 0
2014–15 38,261,000 100,215,380 0
2015–16 38,921,080 102,612,352 0
2016–17 38,689,539 104,409,296 0
2017–18 38,216,129 105,159,168 0

Statutory authority

The CNSC's statutory spending authority is comprised of payments to employee benefit plans and expenditures pursuant to paragraph 21(3) of the NSCA. The NSCA allows the CNSC to respend fees collected in the conduct of a portion of its regulatory oversight activities.

The CNSC statutory spending authority decreased in 2013–14 and 2014–15 because of a reduction in regulatory oversight activities related to Hydro-Québec's shutdown of the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station in December 2012. While the shutdown has had material impacts on CNSC statutory spending authority, the overall CNSC 2014–15 to 2017–18 planned spending sourced from its statutory authority is rising somewhat because of projected increases in cost of living, including salaries. Planned spending is levelling between 2016–17 and 2017–18 because of a predicted slight contraction in the nuclear industry, leading to potential decreases in regulatory requirements – which partly offsets increases in cost of living for that fiscal year.

Voted authority

The decrease in the CNSC's voted authority from 2013–14 to 2014–15 is attributable to the one-time federal government employee benefit adjustment allowing for accumulated severance to be paid out in 2013–14. The increase in the CNSC's voted authorities from 2014–15 to 2015–16 is mainly explained by an adjustment to reflect the completion of loan repayments to Treasury Board's Management Reserve for investments previously made to its information technology and facilities infrastructure. The decrease in voted authority from 2015–16 to 2017–18 is due to the completion of funding received to support the government-wide Single Window Initiative, announced in Budget 2013, to streamline government import regulations and border processes for commercial trade.

Sunset programs

The CNSC does not have any sunset program funding at this time.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the CNSC's organizational appropriations, please see the 2015-16 Main Estimates on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat website. Endnote viii

Top of page

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome   

Strategic outcome:

Safe and secure nuclear installations and processes used solely for peaceful purposes and a public that is informed about the effectiveness of Canada's nuclear regulatory regime.

To support this outcome, the CNSC has five programs: nuclear fuel cycle; nuclear reactors; nuclear substances and prescribed equipment; nuclear non-proliferation; and scientific, technical, regulatory and public information programs. The following section describes the CNSC's programs, with identified expected results and performance indicators. It also outlines the financial and human resources that will be dedicated to each program, and describes planning highlights.

Program 1.1: Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

Description:

This program aims to regulate facilities associated with the nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear processing facilities, nuclear waste management facilities, and uranium mines and mills) to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment in a manner consistent with Canada's international obligations on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

The program regulates all the lifecycle stages for these facilities ─ from site preparation through construction and operation, to decommissioning (or long-term management, in the case of some nuclear waste facilities). The licensing and compliance activities associated with this program are all managed through a risk-informed and performance-based approach. Compliance verification is conducted against established criteria consistent with the licensing basis of the facility. The results of regulatory activities associated with this program are communicated to the public on a regular basis. The program is guided by a management system, and is based on fundamental safety principles for continuous improvement.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015−16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
11,523,104 12,245,890 12,381,333 12,405,253
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
74 74 74
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Nuclear processing facilities, nuclear waste management facilities, and uranium mines and mills are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Number of radiation exposures over the allowable dose limits for nuclear energy workers and members of the public

0

Annually

Number of radiological releases to the environment above regulatory limits

0

Annually

Planning highlights

  • execute baseline and risk-informed licensing and compliance activities for uranium mining and research / processing facilities
  • ensure the CNSC has a clear, consistent definition of risk-informed 
  • perform gap assessment between the proposed risk- informed approach on licensing and compliance activities
  • educate and inform industry and the public on results and actions, if any, required to ensure public and worker safety

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Uranium Mines and Mills

Description:

This sub-program regulates all phases of uranium mining and milling in Canada (including site preparation, from construction and operation to decommissioning). The licensing process follows the stages laid out in the Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations. At each licensing stage, the CNSC determines whether the licence applicant is qualified and has made adequate provisions for the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment. Compliance activities are applied to operating and decommissioned mines and mills. These activities include facility inspections, review of licensee reports, and environmental, radiation and conventional health and safety data analysis.

The stakeholders associated with this sub-program are primarily uranium mines and mills licensees. Currently, operating uranium mines and mills are predominantly located in Saskatchewan, due to the geological composition of the province's terrain.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
4,653,113 4,704,578 4,713,667
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
29 29 29
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Uranium mines and mills are regulated to protect the health,safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Percentage of uranium mines and mills facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above

100%

Annually

Planning highlights

  • execute baseline and risk-informed licensing and compliance activities for uranium mining facilities
  • planning of remedial work for the Gunnar Mine Site Rehabilitation Project
  • planning of remedial work for the Lorado Mine
  • The CNSC will provide technical expertise in the environmental assessment process led by the Nunavut Impact Review Board for the Kiggavik project - a proposed uranium mining and milling operation located in the Kivalliq region of Nunavut

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Nuclear Processing Facilities 

Description:

This sub-program regulates all phases of nuclear processing in Canada (including site preparation, from construction and operation to decommissioning). Nuclear processing facilities process nuclear material ─ either as part of the nuclear fuel cycle, or for other industrial or medical uses. The licensing process follows the stages laid out in the Class I Nuclear Facilities Regulations. At each licensing stage, the CNSC determines whether the licence applicant is qualified and has made adequate provisions for the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment. Compliance activities are applied to operating and decommissioned processing facilities. These activities include facility inspections, review of licensee reports, and environmental, radiation and conventional health and safety data analysis.

The stakeholders associated with this sub-program are primarily licensees associated with uranium refineries, uranium conversion facilities, nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, tritium light source facilities and medical radioisotope processing facilities.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
2,423,106 2,449,907 2,454,640
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
15 15 15
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Nuclear processing facilities are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Percentage of nuclear processing facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above

100%

Annually

Planning highlights

  • execute baseline and risk-informed licensing and compliance activities for Research / Processing facilities
  • develop position regarding on site remediation and decommissioning
  • re-licensing of Cameco's Port Hope Conversion Facility
  • provide regulatory oversight of the re-licensing of the Nordion processing facility in Kanata, Ontario

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Nuclear Waste Management Facilities

Description:

This sub-program regulates all phases of nuclear waste management facilities in Canada which process, store or dispose of nuclear waste (including site preparation, from  construction and operation to decommissioning and long-term storage). Nuclear waste is defined as any material (liquid, gas or solid) that contains a radioactive nuclear substance (defined in the Nuclear Safety and Control Act) and that the owner has determined to be waste (as per regulatory policy P290, Managing Radioactive Waste). Nuclear waste management is regulated through the policies, legislation and responsible organizations set in place to govern the management of radioactive waste in Canada, and outlined in the Government of Canada's Radioactive Waste Policy Framework.

At each licensing stage, the CNSC determines whether the licence applicant is qualified and has made adequate provisions for the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment. Compliance activities are applied to operating and decommissioned processing facilities. Compliance activities include facility inspections, review of licensee reports, and environmental, radiation and conventional health and safety data analysis.

The stakeholders associated with this sub-program are primarily licensees associated with nuclear waste management facilities, categorized by the type of waste managed (low-, intermediate- or high-level radioactive waste).

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
5,169,671 5,226,848 5,236,946
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
30 30 30
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Nuclear waste management facilities are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Percentage of nuclear waste management facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above

100%

Annually

Planning highlights

  • Deep Geologic Repository – Implementation  of the licence if it is recommended by the  joint review panel and approved by the minister
  • Port Hope Area Initiative – Start of construction / remediation activities
  • further developmental work leading to the potential drafting of new nuclear waste regulations
  • long-term waste management facility – Nuclear Waste Management Organization's Adaptive Phased Management process for used nuclear fuel
  • Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. restructuring – regulatory oversight of Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL)

Program 1.2: Nuclear Reactors Program

Description:

This program aims to regulate facilities associated with nuclear energy (nuclear power plants and research reactors), to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment in a manner consistent with Canada's international obligations on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

The program regulates all the lifecycle stages for nuclear reactors (specifically, nuclear power plants and research reactors), from site preparation, construction, and operation, to the decommissioning of the facility and abandoning the site (once operations are ended). The licensing and compliance activities associated with this program are all managed through a risk-informed and performance-based approach. Compliance verification is conducted against established criteria consistent with the licensing basis of the facility. The results of all the regulatory activities associated with this program are communicated to the public on a regular basis. The program is guided by a management system and is based on fundamental safety principles for continuous improvement.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015−16 Main estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
38,370,191 40,776,958 41,227,964 41,307,614
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
248 248 242
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Nuclear power reactors and research reactors are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Number of radiation exposures over the allowable dose limits for nuclear energy workers and members of the public

0

Annually

Number of radiological releases to the environment above regulatory limits

0

Annually

Planning highlights

  • review changes in societal expectations that could have an impact on CNSC safety goals and regulations:
    • defence in depth associated with facilities and activities in order to maximize accident prevention and mitigation measures
    • assess environmental assessments under the NSCA to ensure environmental factors are an integral part of regulatory process and oversight
  • review effectiveness and efficiency of compliance verification program to ensure it is performance-focused
  • review/adapt/update compliance efforts to ensure they are commensurate with the risk exposure and applied across all activities and facilities

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Nuclear Power Plants 

Description:

This sub-program regulates all the lifecycle stages for nuclear power plants in Canada (from site preparation, construction and operation, to decommissioning and abandonment, once operations are ended). Nuclear power plants generate electricity for public and industrial consumption.  The CNSC's licensing of nuclear power plants is comprehensive and covers 14 separate topics referred to as “safety and control areas”, such as design, safety analysis, radiation protection, emergency preparedness, environmental protection and equipment fitness for service. The CNSC assesses licence applications to ensure that safety measures are technically and scientifically sound, that all requirements are met, and that the appropriate safety systems are in place to protect people and the environment. After a licence is issued, the CNSC stringently evaluates compliance. In addition to having a team of onsite inspectors, CNSC staff with specific technical expertise regularly visit the plants, to verify that operators are meeting the regulatory requirements and licence conditions.

The stakeholders associated with this sub-program are primarily power plant licensees: Bruce Power, Ontario Power Generation, New Brunswick Power and Hydro-Québec.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
34,227,439 34,606,005 34,672,862
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
207 207 207
Performance measurement
Expected Results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Nuclear power plants are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Percentage of nuclear power plant facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above

100%

Annually

Planning highlights

  • execute baseline and risk-informed licensing and compliance activities for power reactors
  • implement periodic safety reviews (PSRs) and complete regulatory document on PSR process and the Licence Application Guide
  • provide regulatory oversight of:
    • Darlington re-licensing
    • Darlington refurbishment – approval of integrated improvement plan
    • Bruce Power re-licensing 
    • Gentilly-2 – regulatory strategy for safe storage and decommissioning  
    • Point Lepreau Intrepid emergency exercise – regulatory oversight
  • support the hosting of peer reviews:
    • Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) Missions of Canadian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) [Bruce 2015, Ontario Power Generation (OPG) 2016]
    • International Physical Protection Advisory Service review to be hosted in 2015

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Research Reactors 

Description:

This sub-program regulates all the lifecycle stages for research reactors in Canada (from site preparation, construction and operation, to decommisioning and abandonment, once operations are ended). Research reactors help scientific research, conduct non-destructive testing and produce radioactive substances for medical, industrial and scientific use. The CNSC's licensing of research reactors is comprehensive and covers 14 separate topics referred to as “safety and control areas”, such as radiation protection, emergency preparedness, environmental protection and equipment fitness for service. The CNSC assesses licence applications to ensure that safety and control measures are technically and scientifically sound, that all requirements are met, and that the appropriate safety systems are in place to protect people and the environment. After a licence is issued, the CNSC stringently evaluates compliance. In addition to having a team of onsite inspectors, CNSC staff with specific technical expertise regularly visit the plants, to verify that operators are meeting the regulatory requirements and licence conditions.

The stakeholders associated with this sub-program are primarily research reactor licensees: the NRU reactor at Chalk River, the McMaster Nuclear Reactor, and the SLOWPOKE reactors.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
6,549,519 6,621,959 6,634,752
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
41 41 35
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Research reactors are regulated to protect the health,safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Percentage of research reactor facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above

100%

Annually

Planning highlights

  • Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. restructuring – regulatory oversight of Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL)
  • provide regulatory oversight in preparation for the re-licensing of CNL Chalk River Laboratories (formerly AECL), including the NRU

Program 1.3: Nuclear Substances and Prescribed Equipment

Description:

This program aims to provide assurance to the Canadian public that nuclear substances and prescribed equipment are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment, in a manner consistent with Canada's international obligations on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

The CNSC issues certificates for the design of radiation devices and prescribed equipment to ensure their safe use and issues licences for the safe handling and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and prescribed equipment. In addition, the CNSC certifies radiography device operators who must be certified to use exposure devices, as well as certain radiation safety officers. The CNSC monitors the regulated activities to ensure the safety of workers and the general public, and to protect the environment. The licences issued are categorized into various use types, depending on the type of licensed activity, nuclear substances and prescribed equipment being used, as well as the risk posed by these use types. The regulated activities for which these licences are issued are related to four distinct stakeholder groups: medical, industrial, commercial, and academic and research. Each of these groups uses nuclear substances and prescribed equipment in its work. The CNSC conducts compliance activities to monitor the safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

The licensing and compliance activities associated with this program are all managed through a risk-informed and performance-based approach. Compliance verification is conducted against established criteria consistent with the licensing basis of the activity being regulated. The results of regulatory activities associated with this program are communicated to the public and other stakeholders on a regular basis. The program is guided by a management system, and is based on fundamental safety principles for continuous improvement.  

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015−16  Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
11,891,601 12,637,501 12,777,275 12,801,961
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
77 77 77
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Nuclear substances and prescribed equipment are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Number of radiation exposures over the allowable dose limits for nuclear energy workers and members of the public

0

Annually

Number of radiological releases to the environment above regulatory limits

0

Annually

Planning highlights

  • execute baseline and risk-informed licensing and compliance activities for nuclear substances and prescribed equipment licensees
  • certify exposure device operators with consideration to the new Canadian Standards Association PCP-09 standard
  • implement mobile inspection kits for CNSC inspectors
  • continued implementation of the portable gauge strategy to encourage the safe use of gauges and improve compliance with CNSC requirements
  • enhance regulatory control of inventories of radioactive sources that are no longer used and historical sources
  • implementation of financial guarantees for radiography, portable gauges, and fixed gauges, to eliminate the liability to the Crown

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Medical Sector

Description:

This sub-program aims to regulate the production, possession, and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in Canada as it relates to the medical sector.

The medical sector uses nuclear substances and nuclear energy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Medical applications using radiopharmaceuticals are designed to target specific tissues and organs, delivering nuclear substances to specific areas of the body. Radiopharmaceuticals are widely used in the diagnosis of heart disease and cancer. Nuclear energy (produced by nuclear substances and particle accelerators) is used for radiation therapy, to treat various types of cancers and other diseases.

Licences and certificates are issued for the safe handling and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in this area. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
2,887,227 2,919,161 2,924,800
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
17 17 17
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Nuclear substances and prescribed equipment for use in the medical sector are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Percentage of medical facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above

100%

Annually

Planning highlights

  • execute baseline and risk-informed licensing and compliance activities for the nuclear medical sector
  • consolidate various types of licensed activities by a licensee into one licence
  • ensure adequate resources for the expansion of cyclotron and cancer treatment facilities
  • continue the comprehensive outreach program to medical licensees of nuclear substances and prescribed equipment

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Industrial Sector

Description:

This sub-program aims to regulate the production, possession, and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and prescribed equipment in Canada, as it relates to the industrial sector.

The industrial sector uses nuclear substances for various purposes, ranging from civil engineering work, measurement and control, to the delivery of services such as industrial radiography and oil well logging. These nuclear substances are found in radiation devices, such as fixed nuclear gauges (that monitor production processes in the pulp and paper industry), portable nuclear gauges (that measure moisture and density in soil and the compaction of asphalt in road construction) and in radiography devices (used for materials analysis).  The production of several day-to-day commodities (such as smoke detectors), also requires the aid of nuclear substances, whose use is regulated by the CNSC.

Licences and certificates are issued for the safe handling and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in this area. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor the safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
4,971,234 5,026,216 5,035,927
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
30 30 30
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Nuclear substances and prescribed equipment for use in the industrial sector are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Percentage of industrial facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above

100%

Annually

Planning highlights

  • execute baseline and risk-informed licensing and compliance activities for the nuclear industrial sector
  • continue the comprehensive outreach program to industrial licensees of nuclear substances and prescribed equipment

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Commercial Sector

Description:

This sub-program aims to regulate the production, possession, and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and prescribed equipment in Canada, as it relates to the commercial sector.

The commercial sector focuses primarily on the production and sale of nuclear substances and the third-party servicing and distribution of radiation devices and other prescribed equipment (such as particle accelerators). Nuclear substances are found in many products used to protect the health and safety of Canadians (including smoke detectors, self-lighting exit signs and security-screening equipment). Such devices may not require a licence for possession by the end-user; however, their manufacturing and initial distribution in Canada are licensed by the CNSC.

Licences and certificates are issued for the safe handling and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in this area. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor the safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
1,290,162 1,304,432 1,306,952
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
8 8 8
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Nuclear substances and prescribed equipment for use in the commercial sector are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Percentage of commercial facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above

100%

Annually

Planning highlights

  • execute baseline and risk-informed licensing and compliance activities for the nuclear commercial sector
  • continue the comprehensive outreach program to commercial licensees of nuclear substances and prescribed equipment
  • re-licensing of SRB Technologies (Canada) Inc., Pembroke, Ontario

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Academic and Research Sector

Description:

This sub-program aims to regulate the production, possession, and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in Canada, as it relates to the academic and research sector.

The academic and research sector focuses primarily on biological and biomedical research with open-source radioisotopes. The sector also employs research particle accelerators and research irradiators. Nuclear substances found in the academic field include those used in irradiators (which irradiate cells or samples in research laboratories). Particle accelerators are used for research in the fields of subatomic physics, materials and biomedicine and may also generate some nuclear materials for medical and research facilities. Nuclear substances are used in teaching and research laboratories for diverse activities such as gas chromatography, which analyzes environmental samples.

Licences are issued for the safe handling and use of nuclear substances, radiation devices and other prescribed equipment in this area. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor the safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
1,486,329 1,502,769 1,505,672
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
9 9 9
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Nuclear substances and prescribed equipment for use in the academic and research sector are regulated to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Percentage of academic and research facilities that receive a rating of satisfactory or above

100%

Annually

Planning highlights

  • execute baseline and risk-informed licensing and compliance activities for the nuclear academic and research sector
  • continue the comprehensive outreach program to academic and research licensees of nuclear substances and prescribed equipment

Sub-Program 1.3.5: Packaging and Transport 

Description:

This sub-program aims to regulate the packaging and transport of nuclear substances in Canada. The CNSC's packaging and transport regulations are based on international transport regulations published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), ensuring a high level of safety of persons and to the environment.

The CNSC certifies package designs requiring competent authority approval in Canada and worldwide, and requires the registration of the package user prior to their use in Canada, as a way of ensuring the safe packaging and transport of nuclear substances. Other regulatory requirements (such as labelling, documentation, quality assurance program and radiation protection program for carriers) exist to further strengthen transport safety.

The CNSC issues transport licences for specific circumstances, however transport activities are generally exempt from CNSC licensing. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor the safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
1,511,534 1,528,252 1,531,205
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
10 10 10
Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Nuclear substances are packaged and transported safely in order to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment

Number of incidents in transport resulting in an individual receiving a dose above the limit for members of the public of one milisievert per year

0

Annually

Planning highlights

  • execute baseline and risk-informed  certification, licensing and compliance activities for the nuclear packaging and transport sector
  • ensure that the repatriation of Highly Enriched Uranium to the United States meets Canadian and international regulatory requirements
  • continue the comprehensive outreach program to packaging and transport licensees of nuclear substances and prescribed equipment

Sub-Program 1.3.6: Dosimetry Services

Description:

This sub-program licenses dosimetry service providers under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and the CNSC Radiation Protection Regulations. Each dosimetry service provider must meet the technical and quality assurance requirements outlined in the CNSC's Technical and Quality Assurance Standards for Dosimetry Services. Compliance activities are conducted to monitor the safety and compliance with regulatory requirements.

Dosimetry service providers are either commercial service providers (which service external clients), or in-house service providers (which are nuclear licensees with the capability of providing dosimetry services for their own employees and visitors).

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
491,015 496,445 497,405
Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
3 3 3

Planning highlights

Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Dosimetry services are regulated to protect the health and safety of nuclear energy workers

Percentage of independent tests passed by licensees

100%

Annually

  • execute ongoing baseline and risk-informed  licensing and compliance activities for dosimetry service provider licensees

Program 1.4: Nuclear Non-Proliferation   

Description:

This program aims to provide assurance to both the Canadian public and the international community that the development, production and use of nuclear energy and nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information is safe and conforms with every control measure and international obligations to which Canada has agreed, including those under the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. Under its mandate, the CNSC implements measures of control respecting nuclear non-proliferation, including domestic and international arrangements, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards, and import-export of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2015−16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending

  6,299,582

  6,694,722

  6,768,768

  6,781,845

Human resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18

  34

  34

  34

Performance measurement
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Date to be achieved

Assurance to the Canadian public and international community that nuclear energy and nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information are used for peaceful purposes, and do not contribute to threats to nuclear non-proliferation and radiological safety or security

Maintain IAEA safeguards broader conclusion (the IAEA concludes that there was no diversion of declared nuclear material, and no indication of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activity)

100% Footnote 6

June 30 of each fiscal year

Planning highlights

  • support Government of Canada initiatives and interests related to nuclear non-proliferation, including the quinquennial Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons
  • support the hosting of a peer review of the International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) Mission to Canadian nuclear power plants
  • The CNSC will continue its work and activities in the area of nuclear forensics to support Canada's commitment towards establishing a national nuclear forensics capability
  • CNCS laboratory transitioning into an operational role within the national nuclear forensics laboratory network

Sub-Program 1.4.1: Domestic and International Arrangements

Description:

This sub-program aims to establish and maintain domestic and international arrangements  ̶ in collaboration with other organizations within Canada and abroad  ̶ to implement measures of control and international obligations to which Canada has agreed. 

The CNSC negotiates administrative arrangements with domestic and international organizations to align regulatory systems and processes, to comply with and maintain international commitments, and to implement measures pursuant to Canada's nuclear non-proliferation policy. These measures include bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements with Canada's nuclear trading partners. The CNSC is also responsible for the administration and implementation of the nuclear security programs, and other supporting nuclear security requirements and guidance related to domestic and international activities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
1,044,973 1,056,531 1,058,572
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18

    6

    6

    6

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved

Establish, maintain and implement domestic and international arrangements respecting control of nuclear energy, including those pertaining to the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, the international transfer of nuclear goods, and regulatory cooperation on nuclear safety

Percentage of annual inventory reports of Canadian obligated nuclear goods and technology that are confirmed as meeting CNSC  requirements

100%

Annually

Planning Highlights

  • implement all provisions of bilateral Administrative Arrangements pursuant to Canada's nuclear cooperation agreements (NCAs), including the Canada-India NCA
  • support the Government of Canada establishment and implementation of new or amended bilateral NCAs
  • focus on bilateral agreements with key Federal, Provincial and Territorial counterparts, ensuring coordinated emergency preparedness and response

Sub-Program 1.4.2: Safeguards

Description:

This sub-program activity area aims to maintain the IAEA's broader conclusion for Canada, by ensuring that Canada's obligations under the Canada-IAEA safeguards agreements are met. The broader conclusion is a statement by the IAEA that over a given year there was no diversion of declared nuclear material, and no indication of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activity. The Safeguards Agreement (1972) and the Additional Protocol (2000) are treaty-level instruments between the Government of Canada and the IAEA requiring Canada to accept and facilitate IAEA safeguards on all nuclear material and certain specific nuclear activities. The signing of the Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA was required by the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, while the Additional Protocol is a voluntary safeguards-strengthening instrument signed by nearly all major nuclear states. 

The CNSC maintains the IAEA broader conclusion for Canada ̶ achieved annually since 2005 ̶ to provide assurances to Canadians and the world community of the absence of undeclared nuclear materials and activities in Canada. The annual statement of the broader safeguards conclusion allows the IAEA to adjust their technical objectives for Canada, reducing the national overall inspection effort while also maintaining effective safeguards implementation.  This, in turn, frees up IAEA resources for use in areas of greater proliferation concern.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
2,861,499 2,893,148 2,898,737
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18

  12

  12

  12

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved

Provide assurance to Canadians and the international community on the absence of declared  nuclear material diversion, and the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities in Canada

Percentage of nuclear material reports submitted that are confirmed as meeting requirements with Canada's international commitments

100%

Annually

Planning Highlights

  • facilitate ongoing IAEA inspections and verify licensee compliance with safeguards regulatory requirements
  • increase the number of safeguarded facilities utilizing the Nuclear Materials Accountancy Reporting (NMAR) online system to electronically submit reports
  • through the Canadian Safeguards Support Program, continue to assess and manage projects that will contribute to advance the evolution and improve the application of safeguards in Canada and abroad

Sub-Program 1.4.3: Import-Export 

Description:

This sub-program activity area establishes controls on the exports and imports of nuclear substances, equipment and information, through licensing, compliance and counter-proliferation measures. The objective is to assure that nuclear goods and technology are transferred internationally solely for peaceful purposes, and do not contribute to non-proliferation or radiological security threats. Controls are implemented consistent with requirements under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), other relevant national legislation, international standards and guidelines to which Canada adheres (e.g., Nuclear Suppliers Group Guidelines, or IAEA codes of conduct) and Canadian nuclear non-proliferation policy (e.g., Nuclear Cooperation Agreement provisions).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
2,788,250 2,819,089 2,824,536
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18

  16

  16

  16

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved

Nuclear goods are exported solely for peaceful purposes

Percentage of goods exported solely for peaceful purposes

100%

Annually

Planning Highlights

  • public consultation, publication and coming into force of the proposed amendments to the Nuclear Non-proliferation Import and Export Control Regulations
  • execute licensing and compliance activities for the export and import of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information

Program 1.5: Scientific, Technical, Regulatory and Public Information   

Description:

This program aims to inform the Canadian public ̶ including Canadian nuclear licensees, vendors, academic community, special interest groups, Aboriginal groups, other government departments, other jurisdictions and international organizations ̶ that nuclear facilities and activities are being used safely, in adherence to regulatory requirements and best available scientific and technical information. This program is realized through the processes of generating scientific and technical information, institutionalizing the information within the regulatory framework, and disseminating the information through a variety of channels and engagement practices.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015−16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
26,283,818 27,932,468 28,241,410 28,295,972
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
144 144 143
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved

Scientific, technical and regulatory information is delivered to inform the Canadian public on the effectiveness of Canada's nuclear regulatory regime

Number of views of CNSC web pages related to this program

Baseline being developed

Annually

Number of public requests for information (non-ATIP) or outreach support

Baseline being developed

Annually

Planning Highlights

  • assess current expertise and research infrastructure, internal and external to the CNSC, to identify and assess required capabilities, potential gaps and remedial steps
  • establish mechanism to influence federal nuclear science and technology programs
  • increase the number of CNSC scientific papers, and presentations published in third-party reviewed journals and conference proceedings, and maintain their quality
  • increase the amount of credible and understandable scientific information made available to the public
  • continue regulatory modernization initiative focusing on review of regulations
  • prioritize work on changes to the CNSC's regulatory framework to reflect an evolving industry and changing societal expectations
  • oversee licensee compliance with RD/GD99.3, Public Information and Disclosure, for major licensing activities
  • Provide communications advice and support for Government of Canada-wide initiatives, such as Web renewal and Treasury Board Secretariat electronic publishing guidelines

Sub-Program 1.5.1: Regulatory Framework

Description:

This sub-program develops and makes improvements to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's regulatory framework. The regulatory framework includes the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and its associated regulations, the Nuclear Liability Act, federal environmental legislation, regulatory documents outlining requirements and guidance, and nuclear standards developed by the CSA Group (formerly named the Canadian Standards Association). The framework also takes into account Government of Canada regulatory policy guidance, as well as the views of stakeholders and the general public.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
17,127,390 17,316,824 17,350,280
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
104 104 103
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved

Regulatory requirements and guidance supports nuclear safety

Licensee views on clarity of the regulatory framework 

Measure:  Percentage of licensees, broken down by service line/sub-program, agreeing the regulatory framework is clear, based on survey focus group of individuals responsible for licence submissions

Baseline being developed

Tri-annually

Planning Highlights

  • Develop a 10-year perspective on the Canadian nuclear industry that serves as a basis for regulatory planning and development
  • Prioritize work on changes to the CNSC's regulatory framework in accordance with the Regulatory Framework Plan

Sub-Program 1.5.2: Scientific and Technical Information

Description:

This sub-program explains the scientific knowledge basis for the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's regulatory positions. This sub-program is related to the research sub-program by using scientific and technical information generated from outside sources (contracts, contribution agreements and grants) as well as inside sources (CNSC staff research and analysis) to provide a reasonable base to systematically review existing and new scientific information supporting the regulatory decision-making by the Commission and its delegated authorities. The assessment of scientific information and the explanation thereof is adapted, customized and translated to stakeholders, including the nuclear technical community (nuclear safety experts and academia), nuclear licensees, vendors, special interest groups, Aboriginal groups, other government departments, other jurisdictions, international organizations (such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency), and the general public.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
5,162,658 5,219,759 5,229,843
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
24 24 24
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved

Scientific and technical information supports regulatory decision-making

Number of papers and conference presentations by CNSC staff

Baseline being developed

Annually

Planning Highlights

  • proactively identify topics of interest to the public (for example based on public inquiries and issues/questions raised during Commission proceedings and upcoming Commission items agenda) for the development of plain language information
  • develop and implement the planning targets and administrative processes to permit staff to increase the output of published papers
  • develop and implement a process to track scientific papers and presentations produced by the CNSC and ensure they are posted to the Website
  • facilitate development of plain language abstracts tailored to general public audience to encourage readership of Website postings
  • complete the Laboratory Services improvements and obtain final certification of the laboratory

Sub-Program 1.5.3: Research

Description:

This sub-program conducts research to generate objective, scientific and technical information to address gaps and uncertainties in the CNSC's knowledge base, through the administration of contracts, contribution agreements, and grants. CNSC staff and management attain direct benefits from the conduct of this research. Other beneficiaries include: the nuclear technical community (nuclear safety experts, academic community, research laboratories), nuclear licensees, other government departments, other jurisdictions, international organizations (such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency), and the general public.

This program administers funding from the following transfer payments program: Class Grants and Contributions Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
3,530,635 3,569,685 3,576,582
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
5 5 5
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved

The CNSC is able to improve its regulatory knowledge base.

Percentage of research projects completed  that were used in:

- The regulatory framework (including standards development);

- Commission hearings;

- Other technical assessments by CNSC staff

Baseline being developed

Annually

Planning Highlights

  • promote the redeveloped Scientific and Technical Information section of the CNSC website as a trusted comprehensive source of nuclear safety information
  • support NRCan's efforts to define governance structure of new Federal Nuclear Science and Technology Program including defining programs and infrastructure for federal laboratory and technical competencies
  • conduct regulatory research through approved projects, especially focused on enhanced CANDU reactor safety and aging management
  • undertake a needs assessment for required internal and external expertise and infrastructure

Sub-Program 1.5.4: Public Engagement and Outreach

Description:

This sub-program develops and implements strategies that identify existing and emerging key stakeholder groups, and then develops tools and tactics to reach these specific stakeholders (including the formal duty to consult with Aboriginal groups). The information provided is credible, easily understood, and tailored to stakeholder information needs. Stakeholders include the Canadian public, Canadian nuclear licensees, vendors, the academic community, special interest groups, other government departments, other jurisdictions, international organizations, and Aboriginal groups. 

This program administers funding from the following transfer payments program: Participant Funding Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
2,111,785 2,135,142 2,139,267
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
11 11 11
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved

The Canadian public and interested stakeholders have access to credible and understandable information across multiple media

Outreach program participants surveyed (e.g. Aboriginal groups, schools, etc.) agree that outreach activities and events positively influenced their understanding of the nuclear industry

Baseline being developed

Annually

Planning Highlights

  • undertake a review of CNSC Commission proceeding processes
  • expand outreach efforts to better explain the Commission proceedings process and opportunities to participate, and look to coordinate outreach with Commission proceedings
  • enhance website and continue to develop initiatives to enhance dissemination of nuclear safety information to the public and stakeholders
  • Finalize/implement REGDOC 3.2.2 Aboriginal Engagement and prepare the response to Participant Funding Program Evaluation

Internal Services

Description:

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015−16 Main Estimates 2015-16 Planned Spending 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending
38,811,449 41,245,893 41,702,085 41,782,652
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015-16 2016-17 2017-18
214 214 211

Planning Highlights

  • manage the Harmonized Plan for Improvement Initiatives Program
  • foster an Internal Safety Culture to re-emphasize safety as an overriding priority
  • enhancing capacity, support organizational flexibility and foster employee engagement through:
    • improved talent management practices
    • evaluating the HR planning and staffing framework to ensure that it is responsive to business needs
    • increasing the use of alternative learning methodologies, including adoption of the Canada School of Public Service enterprise-wide approach to learning
    • supporting the development and implementation of Public Service Employee Survey  action plans
    • conducting regular Pulse Surveys to obtain employee feedback
    • active engagement of the CNSC employees in Destination 2020 initiatives
    • maintaining strong union-management relationship through consultation on key organizational initiatives and effective negotiation of a new collective agreement
  • review CNSC security profile to ensure the organization is prepared to respond to any possible events
  • implementation of financial guarantees for radiography, portable gauges, and fixed gauges, to eliminate the liability to the Crown
  • develop a strategy to consolidate CNSC headquarters' staff in downtown Ottawa
  • implement new in-year quarterly performance  reporting along revised Program Alignment Architecture and new Performance Measurement Strategies

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Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-oriented statement of operations

The future-oriented statement of operations presented in this subsection is intended to give a general overview of the CNSC's operations. The forecasted financial information reports on expenses and revenues are prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management. 

The future-oriented statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, whereas the forecast and planned spending amounts in other sections of this report are prepared on an expenditure basis. Therefore, amounts will differ. 

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the CNSC's websiteEndnote ix.

Financial information 2014-15 Estimated Results 2015-16 Planned Results Difference
Total expenses

155,097

 157,495

2,398

Total revenues

105,515

 106,783

1,268

Net cost of operations

49,582

50,712

1,130

CNSC's net cost of operations is expected to increase by $1.1 million (or 2.2%) in    2015–16 when compared to 2014–15 estimated results.  The increase in the net cost of operations is a result of increase in revenue of $1.3 million (or 1.2%) offset by increases in total expenses of $2.4 million (or 1.5%).

The increase in total expenses for 2015–16 is primarily due to projected cost of living adjustments including salary and wages and office rental space.

The increase in planned total revenues is a direct result of the increase in the planned expenses as regulatory fee revenues funds most of the CNSC total expenses.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2015–16 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the CNSC's websiteEndnote x.

  • Disclosure of transfer payment programs under $5 million.
  • Greening government operations.
  • Upcoming internal audits and evaluations over the next three fiscal years.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually, in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Endnote xi publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

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Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Head office
280 Slater Street
P.O. Box 1046, STN B
Ottawa ON  
K1P 5S9
Canada

Telephone: 613-995-5894
Toll Free: 1-800-668-5284
Fax: 613-995-5086

Email: info@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca

Website: nuclearsafety.gc.ca 

External performance standards
Activity Performance Standard Target
Compliance
Verification: Upon completion of the verification activity, the CNSC will:

Issue a Type I inspection preliminary report

At the Type I Inspection Exit Meeting

100%

Issue a Type I inspection report

Within 60 business days

80%

Issue a Type II inspection report

Within 40 business daysFootnote 7

80%

Issue a desktop review report

Within 60 business days

90%

Enforcement: Upon a decision about an order, the CNSC will:

Provide the decision in writing on whether to confirm, amend, revoke or replace the order (see the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Rules of Procedure)

Within 10 business days

100%

LicensingFootnote 8: For requests pertaining to an existing licence, the CNSC will:

Issue a licensing decision when a public hearing is not required

Within 80 business days

80%

Issue a licensing decision when a public hearing is requiredFootnote 9

Within 160 business days

90%

Access to Information

Respond to requests under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act

Within legislated time periods as stated in the acts

100%

External Communication

Place public hearings advertisements

Within deadlines stipulated in the regulations

100%

Follow the appropriate standard for response time to public inquiries

Same-day acknowledgement, with response time for completion of the request depending upon complexity:

100%

Low – same day

100%

Medium – within 5 business days

100%

High – within 10 business days

100%

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Appendix: Definitions

appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures
Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report
Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
full-time equivalent
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures
Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending
For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.
plans
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priorities
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.
results
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
whole-of-government framework
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

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Endnotes

Endnote i

Minister of Natural Resources Canada portfolio, http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/portfolio/10864

Return to endnote i referrer

Endnote ii

Government of Canada, Nuclear Safety and Control Act, http://www.laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/N-28.3/

Return to endnote ii referrer

Endnote iii

Government of Canada, Financial Administration Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/F-11/

Return to endnote iii referrer

Endnote iv

Government of Canada, Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/c-15.2/

Return to endnote iv referrer

Endnote v

Government of Canada, Nuclear Liability Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/N-28/

Return to endnote v referrer

Endnote vi

United Nations, Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons,
http://www.un.org/disarmament/WMD/Nuclear/NPT.shtml

Return to endnote vi referrer

Endnote vii

Whole-of-government framework, http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ppg-cpr/frame-cadre-eng.aspx

Return to endnote vii referrer

Endnote viii

2015–16 Main Estimates, http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ems-sgd/esp-pbc/esp-pbc-eng.asp

Return to endnote viii referrer

Endnote ix

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Future-Oriented Financial Statements, http://www.nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/resources/publications/reports/future-oriented-financial-statements/index.cfm

Return to endnote ix referrer

Endnote x

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Reports on Plans and Priorities, http://www.nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/readingroom/reports/rpp/index.cfm

Return to endnote x referrer

Endnote xi

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication, http://www.fin.gc.ca/purl/taxexp-eng.asp

Return to endnote xi referrer

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Type is defined as follows: previously committed to – committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing – committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new – newly committed to in the reporting year of the Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) or Departmental Performance Report (DPR). If another type that is specific to the department is introduced, an explanation of its meaning must be provided.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Type is defined as follows: previously committed to – committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing – committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new – newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR. If another type that is specific to the department is introduced, an explanation of its meaning must be provided.

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Footnote 3

Type is defined as follows: previously committed to – committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing – committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new – newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR. If another type that is specific to the department is introduced, an explanation of its meaning must be provided.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Type is defined as follows: previously committed to – committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing – committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new – newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR. If another type that is specific to the department is introduced, an explanation of its meaning must be provided.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

Type is defined as follows: previously committed to – committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing – committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new – newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR. If another type that is specific to the department is introduced, an explanation of its meaning must be provided.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

100% refers to IAEA broader conclusion has been maintained for that year.

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Footnote 7

Power reactor licensees are provided 10 working days beyond the exit meeting to supply supplemental information; results for the above take into consideration this allowance.

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Footnote 8

A review of the CNSC External Performance Standards will be undertaken to ensure that indicators are still true and optimal measures of performance.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

The hearing process does not apply to licensing and certification activities that are related to nuclear substances, radiation devices, Class II facilities, prescribed equipment, transport and packaging.

Return to footnote 9 referrer